Department for BioMedical Research (DBMR)

Research Groups

Pulmonary Medicine (Adults)

Lung research laboratory

Chronic respiratory diseases including obstructive lung disease and lung fibrosis are increasing. They lead to respiratory symptoms and can result in breathing failure. Although symptomatic improvement can sometimes be achieved, causative treatments are still missing. Our laboratory focuses on investigations of these lung diseases. We want to improve knowledge about and treatment for these chronic respiratory disorders.

Pulmonary fibrosis

Lung fibrosis leads to impaired breathing and dyspnea. One severe form of lung fibrosis is idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which has no cure available so far. Discovery of new pathways is thus crucial to discover new treatment possibilities for these patients.

We focus on the role of the immune system in pathogenesis of IPF. The immune system seems to play an role in IPF pathogenesis and immune modulation might be a future therapeutical option (Funke group).

We also investigate the effects of stem cells and their products on wound healing and lung regeneration. Stem cell are potential candidates for treatment of several lung diseases (Geiser and Gazdhar group).

Novel research methods are being developed in cooperation with ARTORG lung on chips as an alternative to animal experiments. Breathing lung chips are developed to better investigate potential treatments for lung fibrosis (Collaboration with Guenat group, ARTORG).

Chronic obstructive lung diseases (asthma, COPD)

For optimal administration of drugs and vaccines biomedical Nanoparticle are being developed as carrier. We also investigate the effects of particle on the immune system of the lung (Von Garnier and Blank group). In COPD we investigate the role of the microbiome and its interactions with immune cells.

Cystic fibrosis

A genetic disease, which leads to chronic respiratory disease early in childhood, is cystic fibrosis. In collaboration with the pediatric pulmonology (Latzin group) we investigate pathomechanism and potential drugs for this disease.

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